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Posts Tagged ‘Siberia’

Reviewing 2009 on my blog (mostly for my own information, but I share it because that’s what bloggers do):

My most popular post by far (more than twice as many views as anything else) was my Blueprint for the Complete Community Connection, posted April 27. I proposed a detailed new business model for community news organizations. It received more links from other blogs and more tweets than anything else I’ve written this year. And interest in C3 remains strong. (After traffic on that post declined from June through September, it increased in October and November. December didn’t quite match November, but exceeded August, September and October). C3 gets more attention in a slow month than my average post gets total.

Everyone wants a blog post to go viral, but I’m glad I didn’t write something quirky that went off the charts. C3 was one of the most important things I’ve written this year (or in my career), so I’m pleased that it received more attention than any other post. I’ve been invited to make presentations dealing with C3 in Florida, Nevada, California, Texas, Siberia and Canada. I hope in 2010 to be writing about how Gazette Communications and other organizations are carrying out the vision of C3.

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

Twitter is an excellent crowdsourcing tool.

An email from Jim Cremer, who’s team-teaching a class with me at the University of Iowa next semester, asked if I could geotag my tweets. Our course will teach students how to develop iPhone applications and Jim wanted to show a current course something about geotagging. He thought some geotagged tweets from Siberia would be fun to show students.

I had seen that Twitter was going to be adding geotagging soon, but didn’t know whether it was available yet. I had already left Siberia and was in St. Petersburg. I would be leaving shortly for a walking tour of the city. To tweet without outrageous international data roaming rates, I would need to use the hotel’s free wifi. (more…)

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I occasionally get invited abroad to teach about journalism, innovation or both. I enjoy the learning as much as the teaching.

I spent three days last week in Barnaul, Siberia, presenting workshops on interactive databases and my Complete Community Connection business model. My final presentation on C3 was part of a conference celebrating 20 years of independent press in Siberia (80 percent of Russian newspapers are government-owned, I learned through an interpreter, but the independent press has persevered for 20 years and gathered Friday to celebrate its past and consider its future).

I wouldn’t try to report on the full conference here. Before my own presentation, my concentration was split between the speaker and some tweaks I wanted to make to my own presentation. And listening through interpreters, even the outstanding interpreters helping me here, is a challenge. The faster the speaker, the more the interpreter has to summarize, and some passionate speakers got moving pretty fast. And jet lag has probably affected my concentration. (My wife, Mimi, blogged about our interpreters in her travel blog at Rubyeyedfox and I did an earlier post on the experience of teaching through interpreters.) (more…)

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

Teaching through an interpreter is something like telling a story on Twitter. You have to learn to make each point briefly.

I like to think I develop some rhythm and momentum in my speaking style when I’m leading a workshop in English.

In the same way, I enjoyed the rhythm and momentum of long-form writing in my days as a newspaper reporter. Most of the stories I remember fondly from my reporting were long narratives, in-depth investigative stories and detailed explanatory pieces. But I have enjoyed and learned from the Twitter challenge and excitement of writing something meaningful and clear in just 140 characters. (more…)

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

We have experienced the Siberian winter.

When I first received an invitation to visit Siberia in December, Mimi and I had the same reaction: Siberia in December? Really? What about June?

Kate, host, guide and friend

But on reflection, I was pretty glad the invitation was for December. If you’re going to a place known for its harsh climate, you should get a taste of the climate. Not necessarily a feast, but at least a taste. And we have. (more…)

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I’m a world away from American journalists, speaking through a Russian interpreter, but this still sounds somehow familiar:

When I talk about new tools, new storytelling techniques and new business models, journalists ask whether this is still journalism. (more…)

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Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I love an old front page, especially a historic one.

As much as I spend my time trying to lead, prod and catch up in the digital world, nothing makes me stop and read like a yellowing front page with a historic story or photograph or both. I display historic front pages in my office, two mounted in permanent frames and others rotating into a case my son Joe designed for temporary display. I came to Siberia bearing my own historic front page as a gift to my hosts, and quickly decided I should give it to Yuri Purgin, director general of Altapress, publisher of 13 regional publications, based in Barnaul. I wanted to give him a copy of the June 13, 2008 Epic Surge edition of The Gazette. (more…)

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