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Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’

I have continued using social media to gather advice on using social media for business. I gathered this advice from some people in this area who are connections of mine on LinkedIn. I used the LinkedIn question-and-answer function to email them this question:

How has LinkedIn been helpful to you in your business or profession? If you have found LinkedIn useful, I would appreciate a brief message providing an example of how you’ve used it or explaining which feature(s) you find most useful. (more…)

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Whatever your business or profession and whatever social tools you are using, these tips apply in most social media situations:

  1. Decide what your goal is in using each social media tool and reassess from time to time how well the tool is serving that goal. (more…)

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In the spirit of social media, I asked my tweeps for their advice on using social media for business.

I’m teaching a course, Using Social Media for Business, starting Tuesday evening at Kirkwood Community College. I think you can still register for the course. I know a lot about using social media for journalism and I’ve learned a fair amount about using social media for business as well. But I knew the people I follow on Twitter would know way more than I do. So I asked them (I edited their email messages to me slightly; I did not verify statements they made about their businesses or their us of social media): (more…)

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I was busy enough in June that I didn’t take time to blog about an interesting social-media experience. But when a similar thing happened this week, I decided it was time to take note.

I can’t recall how I first learned about TripIt, though it probably was from Mark Briggs, who was my first TripIt contact. I had already joined Dopplr, a travel-oriented social tool co-founded by my friend Dan Gillmor (who was a reporter assigned to me at the Kansas City Times before he became a new-media star). I travel a lot, so I figured I would try them both out and see which one I liked better. (more…)

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I am crowd-sourcing my plans for two social media courses I will be teaching next month. I will be teaching two continuing education courses at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids: Using Social Media in Business and Online Social Networks for 50+ (Kirkwood offers a series of computer courses geared for people over 50).

I am seeking help from two types of people:

  • Active social media users willing to share their experience and advice, particularly in areas where my experience is light.
  • Social-media newbies or wannabes (including people planning to take the courses) willing to tell what confuses you, how you want to use social media, what you want to learn. It would be especially helpful if you’re a newbie or wannabe in either of the groups targeted in the class: people 50 and older or people wanting to use social media in business.

Below is an outline of my plan for the course on social media for business (outline for the 50+ class will come shortly), with some questions for you in bold. I welcome your advice on the outline or your answers to the questions. And if this sound like a good course for  you or someone you know, I would appreciate your registration for the class or encouraging your colleague(s) to register. (more…)

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I have commiserated and shared advice recently with some friends who lost their jobs as the newspaper industry contracts. Other people who still have jobs are in the same situation I often find myself: trying to develop relationships with potential sources, partners, clients or vendors.

My first advice in either situation: Check out and update your digital profile. This is a good idea for any journalist (or workers in many other fields). Even if you’re not trying to find a job or develop business, someone may be checking you out: sources; people you just met at a conference; someone considering you for the fellowship you just applied for.

Whatever the context, if I want to learn about someone, I am going to pay more attention to what I can find about that person online by myself than to what he or she sends me or tells me. So you should investigate your online profile and see how you look to others. (more…)

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First tweets tend to be pretty lame (mine was), often something like “trying to figure out this Twitter thing.”

Jennifer Preston of the New York Times got off to a better start, asking in her inaugural tweet Tuesday:

Hi, I’m the NYT’s new social media editor. More details later. How should @nytimes be using Twitter?

With 40 characters to spare, she identified herself clearly and started being social, starting to learn and preparing to teach, which is exactly what a new social media editor should do. I also like that she’s identifying herself in her profile as more than her job. She’s also a mother of twins, an author and a friend. It’s a nice contrast to the Wall Street Journal’s admonition against mixing personal and professional, which goes against the culture of the social media.

I’m pleased that The Gazette was several months ahead of the Times in designating a staff member to lead us into the social media. I appointed  Jamie Kelly our social media guide last summer.

I suspect Jamie was better qualified for his job than Preston. Unless she had a private Twitter account (I couldn’t find one) before Tuesday’s appointment, her first use of one of the most important and prominent social networks came after her new gig was announced Tuesday. She’s on LinkedIn (only 15 connections, though that will grow; she already has more than 3,000 Twitter followers) and Facebook, though we don’t know yet how much she has used either. I saw no sign of her on Flickr and didn’t check other social networks she might be on. Her social media education will be quite scrutinized. But on the other hand, not many of us are more than a year or two ahead of her. And as I wrote in a pair of posts early in my Twitter time, you learn quickly.

I responded immediately with a tweet  encouraging Preston to talk to Jamie and to check out my Twitter tips for editors and my post on journalism ethics in social networks. I meant to write a blog post offering lots of advice (as condescending as that sounds) to Preston, but two other bloggers (probably more, but I’ve seen these two), David Kaplan and Patrick Thornton, offered some really sound advice already (Preston already acknowledged Kaplan’s).

I’ll disagree with Patrick on one point: The nytimes Twitter feed has 946,401 followers (it grew by 2,000 from when I wrote the first draft of this post last night), just offering headlines and links. That’s giving a lot of tweeps something they want, so I wouldn’t mess with that. Patrick is right that you should be social in social media, and I encourage being more interactive with other Twitter profiles, but New York Times headlines and links obviously interest lots of people more than they do Patrick. So give those people what they want. And then follow the rest of Patrick’s advice.

Adam Darowski also offered (not directed at Preston, but valuable to her anyway) some helpful advice on “How To Use Twitter and not Be a Douchebag.” I tweeted a link to his piece and then was retweeted 11 times, which is a lot for me.

Rather than echoing or adding to the good advice offered already, I’ll weigh in with a review of Preston’s first 31 tweets (the most-watched Twitter debut since Oprah?):

  • She already has the hang of retweeting, echoing the advice offered to her by several tweeps and replying to more.
  • She understands the importance of links, passing along a link to Kaplan’s blog and to a list of Times Twitter feeds (another link she attempted to pass along was a busted link).
  • Preston understands the value of courtesy, thanking tweeps seven times for their help and praising suggestions she received.
  • She discussed the Times’ use of Twitter, mentioning that Andrew Sorkin had tweeted from an event.
  • She told us that she had attended a Twitter session by some Times colleagues. That would have been a great event for twittercasting (or a liveblog using Twitter feeds from her and other Times staffers attending). She got some advice in that session from Jennifer 8. Lee, whom I enjoy following.
  • She’s seeking (or listenting to) advice from veteran Twitterers, as she noted in thanking Mathew Ingram, communities editor at the Globe and Mail, one of Canada’s Twittering journalism experts. I hope Preston also seeks advice from Times staffers Nicholas Kristof and David Pogue, two Twitterers I enjoy.
  • Preston converses with her tweeps, asking questions to seek clarification or elaboration (sometimes necessary with the 140-character limit).
  • She shows enthusiasm. I’d like to see more sense of humor, though that might be a bit of a challenge to the very serious culture of the New York Times (but it is the culture of social media). (Kristof shows some humor in his tweets, another reason for Preston to study his style and discuss his approach with him.)
  • She doesn’t regard social media as a 9-to-5 job. That tweet thanking Ingram was one of three she posted yesterday evening fairly late.

I hope Preston will lead a vigorous (and public) discussion of how the Times should use social media and what are Times standards regarding opinion, when and how to mix personal with public, etc.

Times ethical issues are aired publicly (Public Editor Clark Hoyt’s column Sunday examined issues dealing with perhaps the two biggest Times superstars, Maureen Dowd and Thomas Friedman). One of the greatest injustices in journalism ethics in recent years was that Rick Bragg was smeared in the wake of the Jayson Blair scandal with a matter that was simply a case of changing standards. Bragg followed a common procedure of using stringers and got pilloried when the standard changed beneath him. We don’t want to see a quality Times journalist smeared by changing or unclear standards regarding social media.

I’m glad the New York Times is venturing into social media in such a public way. I hope @NYT_JenPreston and her colleagues share some valuable lessons with the rest of the industry as they are learning.

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I’ll start by acknowledging the obvious: I have an ego and it’s not small.

This post will share some praise for me and the Blueprint for the Complete Community Connection. Yes, I do enjoy being called a visionary and having people in Finland encouraged to check out my writing and I don’t mind telling you about that. But I hope this post will also illustrate how the connected world of social media works and show the value of digital tools. The story involves blogs, email, three different social networks and a Google translator. And it all took place in less time than it will take me to write this blog.

I received a pingback this morning on my blog, alerting me to a new link to the C3 blueprint. I clicked on the link and didn’t understand much at all in the Mediablogi post by Matti Lintulahti. I was puzzled about what language it was. It had lots of umlauts, but I took some German in high school years ago and knew it wasn’t German. Some of the words had a bit of a Russian sound, but I had never seen umlauts in Russian. I wondered if it might be another Slavic language, but the blog wasn’t using the Cyrillic alphabet. Didn’t seem quite Germanic or Slavic. (more…)

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My Sunday column:

As a young adult, I had this misguided notion that someday I would move from learning to knowing.

Haven’t reached that day yet.

As the calendar turns from one year to the next, many of us savor the year past and wonder what the year ahead might hold. As I look back on 2008 and ahead to 2009, I am pleased with what I have learned and excited by what I still need to learn.

In my sixth decade of life, I learned more in 2008 than I can remember learning in a single year since my youth. (more…)

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