Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Barnaul’

Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I occasionally get invited abroad to teach about journalism, innovation or both. I enjoy the learning as much as the teaching.

I spent three days last week in Barnaul, Siberia, presenting workshops on interactive databases and my Complete Community Connection business model. My final presentation on C3 was part of a conference celebrating 20 years of independent press in Siberia (80 percent of Russian newspapers are government-owned, I learned through an interpreter, but the independent press has persevered for 20 years and gathered Friday to celebrate its past and consider its future).

I wouldn’t try to report on the full conference here. Before my own presentation, my concentration was split between the speaker and some tweaks I wanted to make to my own presentation. And listening through interpreters, even the outstanding interpreters helping me here, is a challenge. The faster the speaker, the more the interpreter has to summarize, and some passionate speakers got moving pretty fast. And jet lag has probably affected my concentration. (My wife, Mimi, blogged about our interpreters in her travel blog at Rubyeyedfox and I did an earlier post on the experience of teaching through interpreters.) (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

We have experienced the Siberian winter.

When I first received an invitation to visit Siberia in December, Mimi and I had the same reaction: Siberia in December? Really? What about June?

Kate, host, guide and friend

But on reflection, I was pretty glad the invitation was for December. If you’re going to a place known for its harsh climate, you should get a taste of the climate. Not necessarily a feast, but at least a taste. And we have. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I’m a world away from American journalists, speaking through a Russian interpreter, but this still sounds somehow familiar:

When I talk about new tools, new storytelling techniques and new business models, journalists ask whether this is still journalism. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

I love an old front page, especially a historic one.

As much as I spend my time trying to lead, prod and catch up in the digital world, nothing makes me stop and read like a yellowing front page with a historic story or photograph or both. I display historic front pages in my office, two mounted in permanent frames and others rotating into a case my son Joe designed for temporary display. I came to Siberia bearing my own historic front page as a gift to my hosts, and quickly decided I should give it to Yuri Purgin, director general of Altapress, publisher of 13 regional publications, based in Barnaul. I wanted to give him a copy of the June 13, 2008 Epic Surge edition of The Gazette. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Read this post in Russian, translated by Google. Читать этот пост на русском языке, перевод Google.

For much of my life, Siberia was this cold, distant land where the Soviet Union sent its dissidents to work in gulags. And I presume Russians, if they thought of Iowa at all, thought of our state as a flat place where we grow lots of corn (Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev visited the Roswell Garst farm in Coon Rapids, Iowa, in 1959.)

While both stereotypes are based in truth (Iowa isn’t really flat, but it is compared to Siberia’s mountains), I know from years living in and around Iowa that the stereotype is shallow and incomplete. I’m sure my stereotype of Siberia is similarly shallow and incomplete. I’m looking forward to learning more about Siberia on a trip that starts Sunday. (more…)

Read Full Post »