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Archive for the ‘Workshop handouts’ Category

Some archives of No Train, No Gain are available through the Internet Archive.

Thanks to Bill Bradley of Philadelphia, who pointed this out in a comment on my earlier blog post about the demise of NTNG, a resource for newsroom training materials, for which I volunteered for several years.

I haven’t explored it fully, but it doesn’t appear that all of the pages have been archived. But I am pleased to see that some have been. Some of my old workshop handouts I have found (most probably in need of updating): (more…)

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Craig Silverman of Regret the Error is leading a workshop for TBD Community Network members (and staff and anyone else in the Washington area who’s interested) this evening at American University’s School of Communication. As supplemental reading for those attending the workshop, I’m posting this handout updated I developed for my Accuracy First workshop when I was presenting ethics seminars for the American Press Institute (updated somewhat). The original version of this handout was initially posted on the No Train, No Gain website.

While this handout is geared to journalists, we encourage all members of the network to follow these practices and those Craig teaches, regardless of whether they consider themselves journalists. Anyone providing information to the public should seek to ensure accuracy to maintain credibility.

In pursuit of excellence, journalists seek to develop lots of sophisticated skills, such as investigative reporting, narrative writing, social media and video. Accuracy isn’t as glamorous as those skills but without accuracy, they become worthless. Accuracy is the foundation upon which journalists must build all other skills. Ensuring accuracy involves several steps: (more…)

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I led a workshop on multimedia storytelling Oct. 2 for the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association. Below are links to the examples I used (and some that I didn’t get to but have used before in this workshop (or might use in the future):

Some examples of Jenny Rogers’ lists for TBD, showing that sometimes you still just write text, but in a different story form:

Things that are longer than the Redskins’ rushing total (more…)

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This is the handout for my workshop on short narrative writing. I used to do this workshop quite often, but haven’t done it for a couple years. The handout was originally posted at No Train, No Gain. I am posting some of my NTNG handouts here, with some updating, because NTNG is no longer online.

A common conflict in newspaper newsrooms today is newsholes getting tighter and writers complaining about space limitations on their stories. While space is not limited online, busy digital readers still favor tighter stories. Without question, some stories lose important substance as they get cut for tighter newsholes. But writers should not assume that length restrictions preclude quality narrative writing. Listen to some of your favorite ballads. Study the storytelling of the songwriters. They tell powerful stories in fewer words than the average daily news story. Use those techniques in your stories. (more…)

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This is the handout for my workshop on personal interviews. I used to do this workshop quite often, but haven’t done it for a couple years. The handout was originally posted at No Train, No Gain. I am posting some of my NTNG handouts here, with some updating, because NTNG is no longer online.

Narrative writing grows from narrative reporting. The foundation of any narrative is the writer’s authoritative knowledge of what happened. Some of the most powerful narrative stories require special care in finding sources and arranging and conducting interviews. Narrative is a powerful way to tell stories in writing as well as in multimedia and especially in packages that use both effectively.

Some of the best narrative stories come from deeply personal stories that often are difficult to tell. Many people are especially reluctant to tell the compelling stories of such intimate or traumatic personal matters as rape, abortion, domestic violence, incest, faith, sexual orientation, bigotry, illness, betrayal, crime, divorce, corruption, family stress, war, disaster, immigration, substance abuse or the death of a loved one. These stories present obstacles, but they are not insurmountable. The challenges tend to fall in four areas: getting the interview, conducting a successful interview, collecting narrative material and telling the story. (more…)

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I led a webinar on blogging this afternoon for the Online Media Campus. My slides are below. I referred participants to the advice I collected from bloggers for a workshop last year.

I’m still interested in your help: What are some tips you have for effective blogging? Please add them in the comments, along with links to some bloggers who illustrate smart blogging techniques.

In addition to the advice linked above, you can get some good blogging advice (and coaching) from Alexis Grant. What are other helpful resources for bloggers?

Blogs I noted during the seminar (in addition to Alexis’ blog): (more…)

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I like it when a training program stimulates questions that continue after the program ended.

Wednesday’s Leading a Mobile-First Newsroom webinar for the American Society of News Editors was such a program. So I’ll continue the discussion with a few questions (which came as we were running out of time or in follow-up emails) and answers (acknowledging up front that I don’t have all the answers):

Q: What steps should we take to adapt websites to be more mobile friendly? (more…)

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I like what the Houston Chronicle is doing to aggregate tweets from the community about breaking news stories.

I asked my tweeps last week for breaking news tips for a Twitter webinar I was leading for the Online Media Campus. I got some great answers from a colleague at the Chronicle (some other tweeps responded as well, and their advice will follow the Houston tips and examples).

Houston tweets, middle bottom of screen

Blog editor Dwight Silverman has enlisted a “Twitter news army” of people using the #hounews hashtag to tweet about breaking news in the community. Chron.com aggregates tweets from the army that use the hashtag in a “Houston tweets” box on the home page.

“We’re actively recruiting more people to take part in Dwight’s ‘Twitter news army,'” Chron.com Content Director Dean Betz told me in a series of direct messages. (more…)

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This is the handout I prepared for a newsroom leadership workshop for the Maynard Academy today at the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University. Here are my slides for the presentation.

The business models that have supported traditional media for decades are breaking down. Some critical elements of the economic crisis:

The Complete Community Connection

To remain relevant for the future, journalists and media organizations need to master digital and social media and develop new revenue streams. My Blueprint for the Complete Community Connection proposes a new business model for community media companies. The core goals: (more…)

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This is the handout for the workshop, developing story ideas, which I presented today for staff members at Gazette Communications. We discussed how to come up with good story ideas and how to develop a plan to execute them.

Every good story starts with a good idea

Story ideas are literally all around you. You need to be alert and imaginative in recognizing and pursuing them. You can generate story ideas by looking in a variety of places: (more…)

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Here is the one-page handout I gave newsroom leaders Saturday at a workshop on Twitter for newsroom leaders at the Mid-America Press Institute. I referred participants to my slides for the workshop as well as to my earlier blog posts on leading your staff into the Twitterverse, Twitter time management, Twitter tips for journalists and Twitter’s value in breaking news.

I don’t know how long Twitter will remain important and useful for journalists in the swiftly changing digital world. But right now a journalist who doesn’t use Twitter is running a huge risk of missing something important. (more…)

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My tweeps came through this week with lots of advice for journalists using Twitter.

On a trip to Ottawa, I led three workshops on Twitter for journalists for Carleton University, the Ottawa Citizen and Canwest News Service. I knew I needed to update the Twitter tips for journalists that I posted in July. Six months ago is a long time in the Twitterverse. So I crowdsourced this project. (more…)

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