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Posts Tagged ‘crowdsourcing’

I’m presenting a workshop on social media this afternoon for the Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association, meeting in Calgary.

Links related to the workshop are my #twutorial series, especially the posts on breaking news, advanced search and livetweeting. We’ll also be talking about crowdsourcing and Facebook engagement, including the use of photos from your archives.

Here are slides for the presentation:

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When I saw Jeff Edelstein‘s music video about New Jersey’s controversial bridge and learned how he crowdsourced it, I asked him to explain. Here’s a guest post from the Trentonian columnist (I added the links, illustrations and embeds):

Jeff Edelstein

Jeff Edelstein

Basically, when you write a Bruce Springsteen parody song about the governor of New Jersey being embroiled in a massive controversy bordering on cover-up, you’re going to need to find someone to put it to music.

This was the position I found myself in Friday morning, Jan. 10.

The Chris Christie scandal was at a fever pitch. It was a day after his press conference, and still at the top of the news.

So I wrote a song. (more…)

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If you didn’t catch the miracle shot, there’s a good chance someone did.

Nearly every high school sporting event has some mom or dad or kid in the stands recording the action on a cell phone video camera or something better. So if you miss the winning shot, be sure to ask for it.

That happened Monday night to Dan Fenner, who covers high school sports for the Oakland Press. He thought he caught the winner, when he shot some video of Todd Moore’s shot with 2.2 seconds left, giving Farmington Hills Harrison a two-point lead over Walled Lake Northern.

Sports Editor Jeff Kuehn picks up the story:

As he was preparing to interview coaches, the ball was put in play and a kid launched a half-court shot to win the game.

Dan tweeted the result and his own dismay.

Meanwhile, colleagues Jason Schmitt and Jeff Dullack got busy crowdsourcing: 

A player from the first game of the double-header came to the rescue:

Jeff continues the story:

Within minutes, it was up on our website, tweeted out to ESPN (possible Top 10 plays) and placed in the later game story. Obviously, it was the number one story on MIPrepZone.

Of course, Dan and his colleagues tweeted their thanks:

A video like that deserves more than thanks, though. This calls for some swag:

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I’m leading a workshop on crowdsourcing this afternoon for the Daily Times in Farmington, N.M.

I’ll be using a lot of the tips from my 2011 post about crowdsourcing.

Here are links to some crowdsourcing examples I will be using (what are some other good examples to add?):

Guardian project on MP’s expenses

Morning Sun crowdsourcing on winter storm

Crowdsourced flooding map

#wheretheyserved map

Guardian coverage of meteor explosion

Atlantic coverage of meteor explosion

Here are helpful links for crowdsourcing (what are some other links I should include?):

Lessons from the Guardian’s expenses crowdsourcing project

Daniel Victor explains a project that used crowdsourcing

Crowdmap

5 ways to crowdsource easily, legally & with quality (Jeremy Caplan)

Lisa Fernandez shares a crowdsourcing (or fetching) lesson

Crowdsourcing Hurricane Irene recovery map in Connecticut

Of course, I crowdsourced tips for the workshop, with pretty good results:

Here are my slides from the workshop:

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I asked my tweeps yesterday for examples of news-based games. They responded, so I Storified their responses. (I initially published the whole thing to this blog from Storify, but the coding was garbled somehow, so I deleted it. The embed code doesn’t work on wordpress.com, so it’s best to read from the link above.

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I will be leading workshops this week for The Gazette in Montreal. Here are links and slides I will be using in workshops:

We will discuss leading a digital-first newsroom. Here are slides for that workshop:

We will discuss the thinking and values of digital-first journalists. Here are slides for that workshop: (more…)

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A beat blog gives a newsroom a vehicle for providing in-depth coverage that the general-interest approach of a newspaper generally doesn’t allow.

I have decades of memories of arguments with editors (when I was a reporter) and with reporters (when I was an editor) about the reporters’ desire to tell stories in greater depth than the interest level of this mythical “typical” newspaper reader. A newspaper has finite space, and to tell the stories that serve this general-interest need of the masses, its reporters gather far more information that has appeal only in niches of people with keen interest in a particular topic.

Beat blogging is a way to serve that deeper level of interest, to use all the information a reporter gathers. It makes a newsroom’s content more valuable to the community, by serving the broad but shallow general interest and the narrow but deep niche interests.

I’ll be leading a workshop today for Digital First journalists in Connecticut on beat blogging. You can watch the livestream and ask questions on a live chat, starting at 3 p.m. Eastern time. You also can read about how the beat blog fits into the full work of a reporter in my earlier posts that addressed the work of reporters covering courts, sports, statehouses and other beats. Other helpful resources would be the BeatBlogging website (no longer active, but loaded with helpful advice and links), my Introduction to Reporting course for News University and my general blogging advice. I’m sure others have produced many other helpful resources. Please share some of those links in the comments.

I will try to compile a list of good current beat blogs, and I welcome your contributions to that list. Who are good reporters who blog regularly about their beats (don’t hesitate to suggest your own beat or someone on your staff)? But for now, I want to offer some basic advice for beat blogging. (more…)

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I enjoy watching journalists grow and learn about our profession. I recounted last month how Lisa Fernandez of the San Jose Mercury News tried live-tweeting after a webinar I led on using Twitter to improve your journalism.

Lisa tweeted and emailed recently about another lesson she learned about engaging with the community:

Lisa’s email to me last week told the story: (more…)

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When I wrote about how a Digital First approach changes a journalist’s work, people asked for more examples.

In that initial post, I provided examples of how the approach would change the work of a court reporter, sports reporter, visual journalist, beat reporter and assigning editor. In response to a question from a colleague planning to hire a statehouse reporter, I blogged separately about how that reporter might work. On Twitter and in comments and emails, people asked me to explain how the Digital First approach might change the work of a business reporter, investigative reporter, lifestyle reporter and a reporter covering multiple beats.

Part of me wants to answer: You tell me. I haven’t been a business reporter in 20 years (though I have covered a few business stories since then). I was never a lifestyle reporter. A purpose of that blog post was to stimulate the discussion and experimentation of journalists so that you would answer those questions for yourselves and colleagues.

But more examples from me might stimulate more discussion and experimentation, so I’ll provide some answers, with this caveat: I’m not spelling out here how anyone should work. I’m suggesting things to consider as you decide how to work. Instead of going through each of the beats I was asked to address, as I’ve done with some of the others, I’ll list some questions and tasks any reporter should consider in working on any beat. I’ll answer them for some of the examples I was asked about, but the answers may be different for your beat. (more…)

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Digital First means different priorities and processes for journalists.

The name and approach of my company, Digital First Media, is getting a lot of attention in journalism, and other companies have declared they will follow a digital-first approach. But I don’t think the approach is yet widely or well understood. As I’ve visited our company’s newsrooms, I’ve heard again and again from editors that they are “all in” for our digital emphasis. But in the next breath, some editors ask questions about what Digital First means for them and their newsrooms. They believe but they don’t fully understand.

Digital First is way more than just publishing breaking news online and shooting video (though it involves both). Steve Yelvington explained:

Digital First is about making the future your first priority, with everything that implies.

It requires restructuring all your priorities. Not just when you do it, but what you do and how you do it.

In a series of blog posts starting today, I will attempt to explain what those priorities mean. I will explain for my Digital First colleagues as well as for the curious and skeptical journalists who are closely watching our efforts to redirect and redefine journalism. (more…)

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Journalists like to keep their work secret, then make a big splash when they publish.

Of course, those big splashes are rare. Mostly we’re covering routine or well-known news, which there’s no reason to keep secret. Perhaps we’d make a splash — even a little one — more often if we were more open with the public, inviting people more openly to tip us to or contribute to potentially big stories.

Several Journal Register Co. newsrooms have recently started publishing their daily news budgets, inviting the public to contribute to the stories they are working on.

(more…)

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I will be leading a workshop this afternoon for the National Newspaper Association on developing a culture of innovation.

I have already blogged about many of the topics we will be discussing in the workshop. Some links that will be helpful to workshop participants interested in following up (and others interested in changing their culture): (more…)

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