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Archive for September, 2011

Update: I just noticed that 99 people had read this blog post in October, which is too bad, because it’s out of date. It no longer works to cut and paste a tweet’s URL into WordPress. But you can cut and paste the embed code from Twitter into the text version of your post.

For several months, I enjoyed being able to embed tweets in my blog using Blackbird Pie. But a few months ago, the embeds stopped working. Today I learned that it’s easier than ever to embed tweets into a WordPress.com blog.

You just copy the URL of an individual tweet and paste it into the text (in visual format, not HTML) as a paragraph. And WordPress embeds the tweet:

(more…)

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A series of tweets last night reminded me of a lesson I should have included when I blogged last month about lessons from my TBD experience.

David Cohn tweeted a link to a Noah Davis story about AOL’s Seed being pretty much defunct. I retweeted with my own comment, without a great deal of thought or analysis.

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Newspaper Next did not succeed in transforming the newspaper industry. But it transformed the career of this journalist.

N2 attracted great curiosity in the newspaper business five years ago today with the release of its Blueprint for Transformation report.

For the next year or so, the American Press Institute project was the talk of the newspaper business. My API colleagues and I made more than 100 presentations to  several thousand executives, sales reps, managers and journalists at industry conferences, seminars and workshops.

As someone who spent most of two years trying spread the N2 message and issuing the N2 call for transformation, it pains me to look back five years later and say that we didn’t bring about any significant lasting change. (more…)

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I will be leading a workshop this afternoon for the National Newspaper Association on developing a culture of innovation.

I have already blogged about many of the topics we will be discussing in the workshop. Some links that will be helpful to workshop participants interested in following up (and others interested in changing their culture): (more…)

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The Reno air show crash was exactly the kind of story that shows why Twitter is an essential tool for journalists covering breaking news.

I was traveling and training and too busy to take more than passing notice of the story, much less study how journalists used Twitter in covering it. But Carl Lavin did that in his blog post: Lessons From Reno: Time For A Disaster Drill. I highly recommend it for editors and reporters covering breaking news, for top newsroom editors and for social media editors. I especially recommend it for curmudgeons denying the value of Twitter.

My favorite detail: That Andy Carvin found eyewitnesses to the crash by searching for tweets near Reno using OMG and various expletives. You can do this kind of location-based search easily with Twitter’s advanced search tool.

By the way, Carl’s daily email newsletter and blog posts give timely tips on news coverage. If you’re not already getting the newsletter or reading the blog, I recommend checking it out.

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I wish I had seen Jay Rosen’s latest critique of “he said, she said” reporting before Saturday’s accuracy workshop at Georgetown University.

Jay provides an excellent example of reporting that is accurate but falls short of the journalistic principle of seeking the truth. That was a key point of the workshop: Yes, we taught about getting quotes accurate and verifying facts, but we stressed that accurate but incomplete or accurate but lacking context doesn’t fulfill the responsibility to seek, find and report the truth.

While I have called for updating some of the details in the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, I love the direct, elegant wording of its first principle: Seek Truth and Report It. “He said, she said” reporting shrugs off this responsibility. In fact, it presents lies equally with the truth, which is hardly different from lying. (more…)

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Brian Moritz asks a question you face in almost every newsroom addressing the challenges of digital journalism: How do you “convert” the curmudgeons?

In a comment on my recent blog post providing social media resources for journalists, Brian, a Syracuse graduate student, asked:

There are some reporters (mainly older vets, but a surprising number of young ones, too) who just do not like Twitter. At all. Think it’s a waste, that it’s ruining our craft. Won’t even give it the time of day. How do you convert these people? How do you get them to the point where they are willing to even honestly give Twitter a chance?

I have two responses: one optimistic and helpful and one dismissive. (more…)

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